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The Spirits (al-Jinn) – And we sought the heavens and found it filled with strong guards and flaming darts

8 Apr

72 The Jinns
Al-Jinn: Makki
________________________________________
In the name of Allah, most benevolent, ever-merciful.
SAY: “I HAVE been informed that a number of jinns had listened; then said:
‘We have heard the wondrous Qur’an,
2. Which guides to the right path; and we have come to believe in it, and will
not associate any one with our Lord.
3. Exalted is the glory of our Lord; He has neither wife nor son.
4. Certainly the foolish among us say preposterous things of God.
5. We had in fact thought that men and jinns would never speak a lie about
God,
6. But some men used to seek refuge with some jinns, and this increased their
waywardness;
7. So they began to think, even as you do, that God would not resurrect any
one.
8. We sought to pry into the secrets of the heavens, but found it full of fierce
guards and shooting flames.
9. We sat in observatories to listen; but any one who listened found a shooting
star in wait for him.
10. We do not know if this means ill for the dwellers of the earth, or their Lord
wishes guidance for them.
11. For some of us are upright and some otherwise: Surely we follow different
ways.
12. We realised that we could not weaken the power of God on earth, nor
outpace Him by running away.
13. So when we heard the guidance we believed in it; and he who believes in
his Lord will neither fear loss nor force.
14. Some of us have come to submission, and some of us are iniquitous.'”
Those who have submitted have taken the right course;
15. But those who are iniquitous will be fuel for Hell.
16. (Say): “If they keep to the right path We shall give them water in
abundance to drink
17. In order to try them through it. But whoever turns away from the
remembrance of his Lord, will be given increasing torment by Him.”
18. All places of worship are for God; so do not invoke any one with God.
19. When the devotee of God stood up to invoke Him (the jinns) crowded upon
him (to listen). Say: “I call on my Lord alone and I do not associate any one
with Him.”
21. Say: “Neither is your loss within my power nor bringing you to guidance.”
22. Say: “No one can save me from God, nor can I find a place of refuge apart
from Him,
23. Unless I convey from God and deliver His message.” For those who
disobey God and His Apostle is the fire of Hell, where they will abide for ever;
24. Until they see what they are promised, when they will understand who is
weaker in aid and poorer in numbers.
25. Say: “I do not know if what is promised you is near, or if my Lord prolongs
its term.
26. He is the knower of the Unknown, and He does not divulge His secret to
any one
27. Other than an apostle He has chosen, when He makes a sentinel walk in
front of him and a sentinel behind,
28. So that He may know if they have delivered their Lord’s messages. He
comprehends all that has been given them, and keeps count of everything.

 

http://www.studyquran.org/Ahmed_Ali_Al_Quran.pdf

 

The reed is comrade to him who has lost his Friend,

7 Apr

Listen to the tale of the reed flute
Complaining of the pain of separation:
“Since they tore me from the reed-bed,
My laments move man and woman to tears
O, for a bosom torn like mine with the wound of
severance,
That I may tell it of the pain of longing!
He who is far from his place of origin
Longs for the Day of the Return
In every company I tell my wailing song.
I have consorted with the unhappy and the joyous;
Each one becomes my friend for his own sake;
None asks the secrets of my heart.
My secret is not far from my plaint,
But eye and ear lack light to discern.”
Body from Soul and Soul from body are not veiled,
Yet to none is it given to see the Soul.
A fire is this noise of the reed-flute!
May whoso has no fire be nought.
The fire of Love has caught the reed;
The ferment of Love has changed the wine.
The reed is comrade to him who has lost his Friend,
It strains rend the veil from our hearts….
It tells of the mystic path of blood,
I recounts the love of Manjun for Layla.
In our woe life’s days are grown untimely;
My days move hand in hand with anguish.
Though they pass away thus, let them go!
Thou remainest, Incomparable Purity….
Yet he who is raw cannot understand ripeness,
Therefore my words must be brief:
Arise, oh my son, burst thy bonds and be free!
How long wilt though be fettered with gold and
silver?

Jalal al-Din Rumi:  Rumi (died 1273), the theologian of Persian poetry , came of an East Persian family which emigrated to Konya, the Saljuq capital of Muslim Anatolia (Rum), shortly before the Mongol invasions devastated Persia and Iraq.

But Rumi’s greatest work is the Mathnavi  “The Qur’an of the Persian Language,’ a vast poem containing fables, allegories and reflections on Sufi thought.  While it has little artistic unity, being apparently written in periods of inspiration over a long space of time.

Rumi also founded the Mawlawi or Mevlevi brotherhood, the “Whirling Dervishes,” whose mystical dance in the sama’, to recall the order of the heavenly spheres, is a sedate gyrating.  Sections of the  Mathnavi or theDiwan such as the superb opening “Song of the Reed Flute.” from theMathnavi, which plaintively tells of the soul’s longing for God, the Source of its existence, were chanted at these sessions.

John Alden Williams Ed., Great Religions of Modern Man, Islam (George Braziller, New York,1962 p. 162-163)

 

The Whirling Dervishes

18 Mar

Listen to the tale of the reed flute
Complaining of the pain of separation:
“Since they tore me from the reed-bed,
My laments move man and woman to tears
O, for a bosom torn like mine with the wound of
severance,
That I may tell it of the pain of longing!
He who is far from his place of origin
Longs for the Day of the Return
In every company I tell my wailing song.
I have consorted with the unhappy and the joyous;
Each one becomes my friend for his own sake;
None asks the secrets of my heart.
My secret is not far from my plaint,
But eye and ear lack light to discern.”
Body from Soul and Soul from body are not veiled,
Yet to none is it given to see the Soul.
A fire is this noise of the reed-flute!
May whoso has no fire be nought.
The fire of Love has caught the reed;
The ferment of Love has changed the wine.
The reed is comrade to him who has lost his Friend,
It strains rend the veil from our hearts….
It tells of the mystic path of blood,
I recounts the love of Manjun for Layla.
In our woe life’s days are grown untimely;
My days move hand in hand with anguish.
Though they pass away thus, let them go!
Thou remainest, Incomparable Purity….
Yet he who is raw cannot understand ripeness,
Therefore my words must be brief:
Arise, oh my son, burst thy bonds and be free!
How long wilt though be fettered with gold and
silver?

Jalal al-Din Rumi:  Rumi (died 1273), the theologian of Persian poetry , came of an East Persian family which emigrated to Konya, the Saljuq capital of Muslim Anatolia (Rum), shortly before the Mongol invasions devastated Persia and Iraq.

 

But Rumi’s greatest work is the Mathnavi  “The Qur’an of the Persian Language,’ a vast poem containing fables, allegories and reflections on Sufi thought.  While it has little artistic unity, being apparently written in periods of inspiration over a long space of time.

Rumi also founded the Mawlawi or Mevlevi brotherhood, the “Whirling Dervishes,” whose mystical dance in the sama’, to recall the order of the heavenly spheres, is a sedate gyrating.  Sections of the  Mathnavi or theDiwan such as the superb opening “Song of the Reed Flute.” from theMathnavi, which plaintively tells of the soul’s longing for God, the Source of its existence, were chanted at these sessions.

John Alden Williams Ed., Great Religions of Modern Man, Islam (George Braziller, New York,1962 p. 162-163)

The Prophets

11 Nov

Our belief concerning the number of the prophets is that there have been one hundred and twenty-four thousand prophets and a like number of plenipotentiaries. Each prophet had a plenipotentiary to whom he gave instructions by the command of God. And concerning them we believe that they brought the truth from God and their word is the word of God, their command God’s command, and obedience to them obedience to God….

The leaders of the prophets are five (on whom all depends): Noah, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad. Muhammad is their leader . . . he confirmed the (other) apostles.

John Alden Williams Islam, Great Religions of Modern Man (George Braziller, New York 1962 (Dissidents of Community The Twelvers p. 228)

 

The Twelvers

11 Nov

We believe that the Proof of Allah in His earth and His viceregent (khalifa) among His slaves in this age of ours is the Upholder (al_Qa’ im) (of the laws of God), the Expected One, Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-‘Askari (i.e., the Twelfth Imam). He it is concerning whose name and descent the Prophet was informed by God, and he it is who WILL FILL THE EARTH WITH JUSTICE AND EQUITY JUST AS IT IS NOW FULL OF OPPRESSION AND WRONG. He it is whom God will make victorious over the whole world until from every place the call to prayer is heard and religion will belong entirely to God, exalted be He. He is the rightly guided Mahdi about whom the prophet gave information that when he appears, Jesus , son of Mary, will descend upon the earth and pray behind him. We believe there can be no other Qa’im than him; he may live in the state of occultation (ghaba) (as long as he likes); were it the space of the existence of this world there would be no Qa’im other than him.

John Alden Williams Ed., Great Religions of Modern Man, Islam (George Braziller, New York,1962 p-228)

 

Listen to the Tale of the Reed Flute

10 Nov

Listen to the tale of the reed flute
Complaining of the pain of separation:
“Since they tore me from the reed-bed,
My laments move man and woman to tears
O, for a bosom torn like mine with the wound of
severance,
That I may tell it of the pain of longing!
He who is far from his place of origin
Longs for the Day of the Return
In every company I tell my wailing song.
I have consorted with the unhappy and the joyous;
Each one becomes my friend for his own sake;
None asks the secrets of my heart.
My secret is not far from my plaint,
But eye and ear lack light to discern.”
Body from Soul and Soul from body are not veiled,
Yet to none is it given to see the Soul.
A fire is this noise of the reed-flute!
May whoso has no fire be nought.
The fire of Love has caught the reed;
The ferment of Love has changed the wine.
The reed is comrade to him who has lost his Friend,
It strains rend the veil from our hearts….
It tells of the mystic path of blood,
It recounts the love of Manjun for Layla.
In our woe life’s days are grown untimely;
My days move hand in hand with anguish.
Though they pass away thus, let them go!
Thou remainest, Incomparable Purity….
Yet he who is raw cannot understand ripeness,
Therefore my words must be brief:
Arise, oh my son, burst thy bonds and be free!
How long wilt though be fettered with gold and
silver?

Jalal al-Din Rumi:  Rumi (died 1273), the theologian of Persian poetry , came of an East Persian family which emigrated to Konya, the Saljuq capital of Muslim Anatolia (Rum), shortly before the Mongol invasions devastated Persia and Iraq.

But Rumi’s greatest work is the Mathnavi  “The Qur’an of the Persian Language,’ a vast poem containing fables, allegories and reflections on Sufi thought.  While it has little artistic unity, being apparently written in periods of inspiration over a long space of time.

Rumi also founded the Mawlawi or Mevlevi brotherhood, the “Whirling Dervishes,” whose mystical dance in the sama’, to recall the order of the heavenly spheres, is a sedate gyrating.  Sections of the  Mathnavi or the Diwan such as the superb opening “Song of the Reed Flute.” from the Mathnavi, which plaintively tells of the soul’s longing for God, the Source of its existence, were chanted at these sessions.

John Alden Williams Ed., Great Religions of Modern Man, Islam (George Braziller, New York,1962 p. 162-163)

 

The Overturning

10 Nov

In the Name of God the Compassionate the Caring

When the sun is overturned
When the stars fall away
When the mountains are moved
When the ten-month pregnant camels
are abandoned
When the beasts of the wild are herded together
When the seas are boiled over
When the souls are coupled
When the girl-child buried alive
is asked what she did to deserve murder
When the pages
are folded out
When the sky is flayed open
When Jahim is set ablaze
When the garden is brought near
Then a soul will know what it has prepared
I swear by the stars that slide,
stars streaming, stars that sweep along the sky
By the night as it slips away
By the morning when the fragrant air breathes
This is the word of a messenger ennobled,
empowered, ordained before the lord of the throne,
holding sway there, keeping trust
Your friend has not gone mad
He saw him on the horizon clear
he does not hoard for himself the unseen
This is not the word of a satan
struck with stones

Where are you going?
This is a reminder to all beings
For those who wish to walk straight
Your only will is the will of God
Lord of all beings

THIS SURA OFFERS A COSMIC UNVEILING. The sky, the seas, the mountains, the normal order of life are pulled away, and the deepest secret within revealed

The English word apocalypse is derived from the Greek word for unveiling.  In the Overturning, one mark of the apocalypse will be the question addressed to young girls who were buried alive.  In ancient bedouin society, male children were valued more than female children …