Archive | August, 2015

Through the “Looking Glass”

31 Aug

Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair

31 Aug

 

Flower Power

31 Aug

Flower Power

Flower power was a slogan used during the late 1960s and early 1970s as a symbol of passive resistance and non-violence ideology.[1] It is rooted in the opposition movement to the Vietnam War.[2] The expression was coined by the American beat poet Allen Ginsberg in 1965 as a means to transform war protests into peaceful affirmative spectacles.[3][4][5] Hippies embraced the symbolism by dressing in clothing with embroidered flowers and vibrant colors, wearing flowers in their hair, and distributing flowers to the public, becoming known as flower children.[6] The term later became generalized as a modern reference to the hippie movement and the so-called counterculture of drugs, psychedelic music, psychedelic art and social permissiveness.[7]

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Flowers for Algernon

31 Aug

 

Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960.[2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year’s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17).[3]

The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled.[4][5]

Although the book has often been challenged for removal from libraries in the US and Canada,[6][7] sometimes successfully,[8] it is regularly taught in schools around the world[9] and has been adapted many times for television, theatre, radio, and as the Academy Award-winning film Charly.

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The Triple Entendre

31 Aug

Triple entendre

Three Sixes

31 Aug

Three Sixes Dice

 

[The] original human nature was not like the present, but different.  The sexes were not two, as they are now, but originally three in number; there was man, woman and a union of the two, having a name corresponding to this double nature, which once had a real existence, but is now lost, and the word “Androgynous” is only preserved as a term of reproach.

Abridged from Plato. “Symposium,”  Benjamin Jowet, trans,. Great Books of the Western World, 7. p. 157

The New Bohemians

31 Aug